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Hungama TV strengthens weekend slot with Vir: The Robot Boy

MUMBAI: Close on the heels of refreshing its on-air look, Hungama TV is all set to strengthen its weekend slot with the launch of ‘Vir: The Robot Boy’, a weekly animated comedy/adventure series set in the desi heartland of India.

Produced by Maya Digital, the series will go on air from 9 November at 11.30 am.

Vir is a heartwarming story of a robot with human like qualities and a unique blend of emotions and superhuman abilities. The series follows his humorous escapades as he manages to save the day with his quick thinking and a wide array of robotic abilities, along with his closest friends – Chulbul the pet Donkey, 8-year- old Imli and Gintu, his magical Djinn.

“We recently launched a fresh new look for Hungama TV, which embodies the spirit of friendly mischief and spontaneous laughter which is our core proposition for the channel. VIR: The Robot Boy truly celebrates the spirit of childhood and personifies what the channel represents. We are confident that kids will develop a great affinity to the local narrative, humour and situations that Vir and his friends find themselves in,” said Disney UTV Kids Network Director, Programming Devika Prabhu.

Maya Digital Studios CMD Ketan Mehta added, “We already have Indian animated shows on air which has become immensely popular. With Vir, we are expanding more. The channels, till now, were basically thriving on recycling of American or Japanese shows. But slowly, they are opening up to the idea of home-grown shows. To penetrate the Indian market, it is important to come up with Indian content that is relatable to the audience.”