19 Oct 2017
Live Post
Fashion TV working on India linear, SVOD launch by 2018-end
Baggage tow tractor rams into Air India plane at IGI
Reliance says Jio to turn profitable 'shortly'
Presence of outsider in Talwars' flat cannot be ruled out: HC on Aarushi case
Gauri Lankesh murder: Suspects' sketches released but SIT has nothing else

Netflix to double amount of original content in 2016

MUMBAI: Netflix chief content officer Ted Sarandos said that the Internet TV service provider will have 31 shows next year compared to the 16 that it released in 2015.

Netflix will also launch 10 movies, 10 stand-up specials, 12 documentaries and 30 children’s shows, Sarandos said at the UBS Global Media and Communications Conference.

“It is not just a lot of volume. If you want a lot of volume, you could go to Youtube for free and get a lot of volume. This is high quality stuff; somewhere last year we had 34 Emmy nominations, Oscar nominations, 10 Golden Globe nominations. This is programming that people want to watch.

“And just this quarter alone we’ve released ‘Jessica Jones’ and ‘Master of None’, which are both ranked by most critics as the best ten shows on television. So we’ve been able to scale this and maintain the quality and excitement of those original first shows like ‘House of Cards’ and ‘Orange Is the New Black’.”

2015 was a breakthrough year for originals, Sarandos added. Besides ‘House of Cards’ and ‘Orange Is The New Black’, there was also ‘Bloodline’, ‘Daredevil’ and ‘Grace And Frankie’.

Sarandos also mentioned about Netflix’s breadth of programming. “If you want to have programming that matters, you have to have a breadth of programming. People who really loved ‘Hemlock Grove’ are not the same people who love the ‘House of Cards’; they are two big audiences. So this year we did ‘Grace and Frankie’ and ‘Longmire’, which were geared to older audiences. So it’s great that we are able to go after a different broader demographic.”

Speaking on sports, Sarandos said that Netflix would not get into live sports or live news. Since on-demand would not add value to Netflix subscribers, it wouldn’t make sense in acquiring rights to big sports leagues or compete with broadcast news.

So will Netflix never do sports? “I’m not saying that we would never do sports, but just like news I’m not attracted. The on-demand doesn’t make the sports experience better for the viewer. It’s the live element that makes you want to watch. So it’s isn’t core viewing strategy for us,” Sarandos said.

“I do think there’s the other problem which is that leagues have all the pricing power in that business forever. If there was a model where we would create our sports league, that might be interesting. But it’s a pretty unusual thing to be able to pull it off. But that is what would take to get me in the sports arena,” he added.